On the Couch with Lydia Lee

Tyler Knight

This interview is a departure from the On the Couch series and Porn Star Vignettes. There’s no focus on a ‘day in the life’ or it being anything other than a straightforward interview. Nonetheless, I’m adding it to the On the Couch catalog for now.

Much is discussed.

Tyler talks about getting into the adult industry, meeting bestselling author Tucker Max as a consequence of starting his blog in 2008, and his forthcoming memoir. Tyler discusses his views on the Measure B condom ordinance, women who charge more to work with black performers, and his criticisms of the industry–Manwin as the “vertically integrated Goldman Sachs of porn”, as well as performer agents who would push performers to work during a moratorium [last August--reference link here].

It’s refreshing to hear Tyler clarify that his blog is not a completely accurate representation of his entire time in the adult industry and that he doesn’t regret his career. It was a pleasure speaking with him on-camera and off.


Ron Jeremy

This 2010 interview finds Ron Jeremy talking about a number of interesting things. Then again, Ron Jeremy is a very interesting person.

We start talking about the double standard where boys vs. girls exists in child-rearing. Actually, we start with Ron playing what he thinks is the Scottish National Anthem on the keyboard and harmonica, then we move onto child-reading double standards.

Ron talks about the strength of feminism in California; the difference between European and American porn performers (American women have choices/European women do not); the difference between American porn performers of the early days vs. porn performers today.

Ron talks about how feature dancing really changed the money situation for performers, and how that influenced exotic dancers to rush to the industry in droves. He talks about early stigmas against doing escort work and how companies wouldn’t hire women who did escort work vs. women who became more comfortable going to Nevada to work as prostitutes legally because Sunset Thomas and Teri Weigel made it less taboo.

Ron talks about the difference in treatment between mainstream and adult sets. He talks about the impossibility of a performer’s union because no one draws enough money and power to walk off a set and really threaten the way things are done (making comparisons to suck big names in mainstream as Meryl Streep and Jack Nicholson).

We wrap up talking about so-called “damaged” porn performers and how the adult community is a microcosm of Hollywood. He shares things I certainly didn’t know about a few performers who took their own lives and basically leaves us with a most memorable evening full of humor and insight.
You can buy Ron’s book, The Hardest (Working) Man in Showbiz on Amazon.com.


Nina Hartley

In this 2010 interview the amazing, legendary, incredible (words do not do her justice!!) Nina Hartley talks about Candida Royalle; not mixing alcohol with sex–especially when you’re young; and having safe sex to avoid that “death and babies” thing. Ha!!

Nina talks about her parents (both Buddhist Priests) and the process of being understood–since she was the odd one of the family. She talks about getting into the adult industry at age twenty-five and the difference between directors and performers from the 80′s to now; extreme acts vs. extreme passion; her How-To line with Adam & Eve; being a feminist; emotional development and trauma.

Nina also talks about being in a healthy relationship. She talks about her book Nina Hartley’s Guide to Total Sex, the process with Penguin, the cover art, what she loves about it and her criticisms.

Very, very interesting is her conversation about starting The Pink Ladies Social Club in the 80′s with Porsche Lynn, Jeanna Fine, Angel Kelly and the adversity they received from the industry. She talks about the impossibility of a union for performers and how the now defunct AIM Healthcare received a lot of “push back” for telling performers they didn’t have to do anything they didn’t want to do.

Finally, Nina talks about religion and her goal to help people improve their sexual literacy so they can improve their sexual happiness and comfort.


Jennie Ketcham

This interview was shot in 2010, but Jennie Ketcham (fka Penny Flame) has a new book out entitled I Am Jennie.

Our interview covers her transformation back into Jennifer Ketcham and her feelings about the adult industry and performers, at that time. We discuss the difficulty of exiting porn and getting a regular job, her role on Dr. Drew’s rehab shows, porn stars who turn religious, society biases and the fact that she doesn’t regret her past but would never choose to do it again.

I wish Jennie the best in everything she chooses to do and hope you enjoy this intimate interview.


Dr. Chauntelle Tibbals

This interview has been re-edited to present my entire interview with Dr. Chauntelle Tibbals; minus a few topics, but only a few. I don’t want the majority of viewers who watch Part 1 to skip on to a different video without seeing the guts of the interview; hence the re-edit.

Dr. Tibbals explains how she became interested in exploring the truth about the Los Angeles-based adult industry, social constructs, stereotypes and gender issues, feminism and individual life perspectives, cultural biases and insensitivities towards men and women.


Zoe Britton

It was a pleasure interviewing Zoe Britton in 2010. She’s a whip smart Texan with a bubbly-yet-no-nonsense personality. Great interview, great lady.

(Find a thorough writeup of this interview at here!)


Holly Hollywood

I wish I had posted this sooner, but a tragedy only a few months after shooting diverted my attention. The time sensitive portion of this interview can be found at http://www.juliemeadows.com/blog/2010/05/17/holly-hollywood-interview-for-fundraiser

This interview is over two years old but it still stands the test of time, and it was Alana Evans’ recent interview with Dr. Drew–answering the question of whether or not a porn star can be a good mother–that reminded me of it. I think it’s safe to say people like Holly Hollywood prove that a porn star can be a magnificent human being, period.

Holly’s website appears to be down for good, but I am friends with her through FaceBook, so I took a look and it shows her happy and living her life away from the adult industry, so I won’t add any links unless she asks me to. Mainly I want this out in the world for her and other capable women who also perform sex work who care for their families, don’t abuse drugs and defy the stereotype that a porn star is a deviant, law-breaking victim and predator who abuses children and hates men.

We talk about the condom mandate, how daunting the task is of finding a “regular” job after porn, her dog attack and successful surgery, sky diving, her day on the set of “Boogie Nights”, her many charitable endeavors: cancer (because of a good friend); A is for Autism (because she has a special needs child); Ride to Recovery (a charity for veterans); a charity event she threw just for Stephanie Swift in Long Beach to help her through her own cancer ordeal. We talk about piracy and unions, a book entitled The Four Agreements, taking your inspiration where you can find it and generally being a good person who cares and makes a difference in this world by example. She is an amazing person and a very good mother.

I highly recommend watching the first interview at the link above. The opportunity to meet people like Holly Hollywood was the reason I started shooting a documentary in 2010 and I wish her all the best in everything she and her family endeavors to do.


For archive videos of On The Couch, visit myJulie Meadows YouTube page


2 Comments

  1. Hello – To begin with I want to just remark that I am a 57 year old Irish (originally Roman Catholic) male. This is relevant because I don’t know anyone of my contemporaries who is not sexually repressed in some way! (I probably am myself).
    However I am writing in response to the interview with Nina Hartley. I loved it. I loved it because Nina and indeed Julia both come across as intelligent clued in women who understand that they have firstly an element of choice when it comes what they do while working in the sex industry.
    I am sure I am not alone when I say that I was forever fed the line that women in Porn were repressed, did it at gunpoint or for drugs or some other nasty negative reason.
    Listening to Nina you can hear that she has at some point made a conscious decision that she is doing this, yes because she is getting paid for it, but much more importantly because she enjoys it.! This is such a turnaround in the normal propaganda thought process as dished out by the normal middle class media.
    I would love to see a movie made by some one like Nina where she would do a kind of … my top ten porn/sex scenes – not from a commercial point of view but from a point of view where you can see the performers taking part and ENJOYING themselves… I was laughing listening to her talk about good scenes and bad scenes and good partners and bad partners – just because you are a porn star doesn’t mean Joe Bloggs in not unattractive, or a guy with a small d**k is not necessarily a lousy lover etc.
    I have followed some links to this web site so I will now read the rest of your blog, well done and keep up the good work

  2. Thank you, Paul!

    Nina is amazing. There are many of us who enjoy sex as a human interaction and are tired of being shamed for it. We’re tired of men being shamed, as well. You’ve probably seen and heard interviews with Tanya Tate, yes? She talks about Ireland and porn there and sexual repression. In fact, I’m attaching an interview conducted by myself and friend, Dr. Chauntelle Tibbals, where Tanya talks about being invited to University College Dublin’s Literary and Historical Society’s debate on adult entertainment and sex last year and being canceled after authorities stepped in: http://thegeekgoddesses.podbean.com/2012/08/23/geek-goddesses-volume-8-82312/

    I’m so glad you found my site!

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