After Porn Ends – a review

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I’ve been wanting to watch this for some time, and it’s not bad. Minus one person I won’t name, After Porn Ends is interesting. Everyone else comes across as very real.

By the time this is shot and released in 2010, Tyffany Million is a bounty hunter–by far the coolest after-porn job (to this Texan, anyway).

Her segment is pretty funny. She talks about what sex was for her as a performer and laughs at remembering the fans complimenting her for her “real” scenes. “I’m the biggest damn faker you ever met,” she says, laughing. Million’s matter-of-fact presence is quite endearing and provided me my only laugh-out-loud moment.

The documentary also features Raylene and Crissy Moran–both super sweet; Seka, Richard Pacheco, Mary Carey, Randy West, Houston, Amber Lynn, Asia Carrera and John Leslie (R.I.P.). Nina Hartley, Luke Ford and Bill Margold have straight interviews that are broken up among the in-depth interviews.

Bill Margold is definitely a character, but he comes across a bit dramatic.

In Jerry Butler’s autobiography Raw Talent, Butler delivers a rough summary of Bill’s business card upon meeting him in the 80s: “God created man and Bill Margold created himself.” That’s Bill. He doesn’t always give the most accurate depiction because he goes for the flare in putting things across a certain verbal way. For instance, in After Porn Ends he characterizes porn as “The Playpen of The Damned”. [He also uses this phrase when I interviewed him last year--here.] But everyone who knows him understands this about him. I think I can safely say, if you shave about 25% of the dramatise off Bill’s statements, you’ve got a fairly accurate interpretation of what’s what.

Mmm… In some cases maybe shave a little more.

Luke Ford became known as the industry gossip guy years ago, but eventually gave it up. He always seemed, to me, like someone who had a rough time in life.

My introduction to Ford was on a VCA set around 2001-2002. His very first question to me was if I’d been sexually molested as a child. I took offense to that for years before finally realizing that what I perceived was assumed about me might be a projection of something he struggled with, himself. In fact, if you are determined to lend the term “broken” to a porn or porn-related person, Luke Ford is definitely someone who seems to epitomize that idea. He always seemed like a very sad indivudual, and his comments in this documentary do not challenge that estimation at all.

“When you’re involved in this industry you lose your humanity. You’re no longer treated as a human being by 80% of people ‘out there’. You’re now scum. They may want to… do certain things with you, but then you’re still scum.They may be thrilled to have a roll in the sack with you, but when you leave they’re gonna want to burn the sheets.

People who are well-adjusted and have good life skills who are doing something meaningful and constructive with their lives, they’re not in the industry to begin with. So the people who are in the industry are really broken, twisted souls without a lot of great job skills. They’re turbulent souls so, they’re always going to be twisting and turning in the wind.

You hear of some people who you talk to who are leading normal lives and are doing pretty good. Like, how the hell would you really know? Like how would you know what really goes on in their life at 2am; the torment? … They’re gonna tell you about all the times they’ve been rejected and isolated and the horror and the shame that their children confront, and that their spouses confront, and the shame that they’ve put their families through, and relationships that have been permanently broken? I mean, all the burned bridges behind them because they did sex work? You know, most families aren’t proud when their daughters become hookers.”

I don’t think sex work as a humbling experience is the worst thing that could happen to a person, especially a shallow person. Sex work can deepen the soul and introduce you to your own humanity, if you’ll allow it. If you already think badly about yourself, anything you do in life will probably just enhance those feelings.

There’s no denying that some people have entered and left porn and had a very hard time in life, but taking the bitter route seems–to me, at least–like a new variation on the same old set of bad decision-making habits.

The ‘Mom and Dad aren’t proud of their hooker daughter’ view is insulting to any true adult. My mother and father don’t want to imagine me having sex in a monogamous relationship, let alone for work–and visa versa. That’s a distinct aspect of kinships and precisely why you tell your relatives and loved ones you are going to perform on-camera sex work before you take one job. It’s a respectful head’s up that acknowledges they are adults that could come across your work. And it doesn’t hurt that the deliberate, conscientious choice to understand and respect the childhood/adulthood separation and all the mature differences that come with it is what makes adulthood infinitely more rewarding that childhood. Childhood exists in a vacuum of stunted growth. It is limiting. I wouldn’t go back to that. I’m happier knowing more, happier having been through more; being a sexual being, in charge of my life and the master of my own destiny. I’m happy to claim my life, and my parents are happy to regard me as a fellow grownup. Anyone too immature to do that, I don’t want in my life. I’m not saying there is anything wrong with nurturing the child within, but I would never counsel someone to surrender their hard-eaned sense of self from lessons learned in order to defer to people so unimaginative and disgusted by their personal ideas of ‘right’ and ‘wrong’ that they might literally subject themselves to be treated as if they were “scum” or without humanity. Rather than accept such projections as true, maybe we should be constantly gathering the strength to challenge it? There’s nothing wrong with dropping that burdensome victim status and disproving stupid stereotypes.

I’d say that Tyffany Million and Richard Pacheco’s daughters saying very mature, sweet and supportive things about their parents is the highlight; a nice rebuff to that whole ‘shaming family members, loss of humanity’ thing. All said and done, I enjoyed it.


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Author: Julie Meadows

Francophile, oenophile, French Scrabble advocate and future zombie apocalypse survivor.

7 Comments

  1. I was able to see it through Netflix Streaming.

  2. I happened to watch this, on Netflix, not too long before you posted this review. I find myself watching these to see if I can figure out if the people behind these are for or against the industry; or maybe they’re neutral. I wasn’t sure with this one; I’m leaning toward neutral I guess.

    If you took the gossip columnist out of the documentary, I think it would’ve been better.
    At the time I had watched the documentary I didn’t know who Luke Ford was, or how he was relevant to the video. Parts of me are still trying to figure out what possible insight he could have to a person’s life after leaving the adult industry, his information is at best second-hand knowledge. Also, he didn’t seem to be a reliable source for information with his obvious view of people in the industry.

    I liked the spectrum of different people that were featured, with their different feelings for the industry they had left behind.

  3. Thank you Lydia. I enjoyed this documentary with the exception of the Luke Ford interview. He came across like he had a sort of a sour grapes attitude. I had read things about him in the past – that he supposedly had threats leveled against him because of things he wrote. I myself have issues with the state of adult films these days, mostly with the way I perceive women are treated. My wife will no longer watch with me after seeing the umpteenth “Southern trespass” ( I’m sure you know what that is). And the cartoonish way that most black portray themselves in IR scenes. Anyway, I’ll shut up now. Really enjoy your blog!

  4. I think neutral, but leaning towards *not* insane, if that makes sense? In other words, The Price of Pleasure is a film where severe anti-pornographers and some of the more BDSM-leaning producers are cherry-picked to highlight the anti side. Not neutral and definitely leaning towards the insane.

    Luke Ford was always a bizarre, stalker-like guy. I interviewed for him and I am pretty normal. Did he follow me around after that to get the bigger scoop on me? No. He never pursued another interview and always regarded me with a very blank expression, like he couldn’t quite figure me out. I’d catch him staring at me on set and it was weird. I thought maybe it meant he was intrigued, but it could easily have meant that I threatened him somehow. The only other interaction was his posting a not flattering picture of me on his site–found it years later, as I never read his site while he ran it. He specialized in embarrassing people and making them look ridiculous. Christy Lake sued him for posting lies about her. In fact, from his Wikipedia page:

    “Ford was sued for defamation multiple times by people in the porn industry, including by RJB Telecom, whom he (as well as the Federal Trade Commission) accused of dishonesty; Christi Lake, whom he mislabeled in a bestiality photo; and Laurie Holmes (widow of John Holmes), for accusations of prostitution on the set.”

    Charming guy, huh? At least he wasn’t in bad company in this film with SL. I can’t say for certain that she’s crazier, but next to her he looks slightly more credible.

    Dale–Got this comment on my Kayden Kross interview on YouTube today. I’m not kidding:

    “Watch the documentary- “When Porn Ends”. Luke Ford sums it all up “Porn is what people do when they don’t want responsibility, they don’t fit in the 9 to 5 world. They do this when they just don’t want to work like the rest of us.” Don’t try to baffle us with this bullshit.”

    My response: “Read my review of When Porn Ends at my site. I sum up Luke Ford, “I don’t think sex work as a humbling experience is the worst thing that could happen to a person, especially a shallow person. Sex work can deepen the soul and introduce you to your own humanity, if you’ll allow it. If you already think badly about yourself, anything you do in life will probably just enhance those feelings. There’s no denying that some people have entered and left porn and had a very hard time in life, but taking the bitter route seems–to me, at least–like a new variation on the same old set of bad decision-making habits.” P.S. – Luke’s “job” was running his porn site. Don’t try to baffle us with this bullshit.”

    I suppose athletes and other types of actors should be run out of town because they don’t fit in in the 9 to 5 world?? I usually get intelligent comments there.

  5. here, here! another amazing article lydia!!!!!!!!

    “I don’t think sex work as a humbling experience is the worst thing that could happen to a person, especially a shallow person. Sex work can deepen the soul and introduce you to your own humanity, if you’ll allow it. If you already think badly about yourself, anything you do in life will probably just enhance those feelings.”

    AMEN. i just love it. couldn’t say it better. sex work actually made me feel *better* about myself!! i still miss a lot of it.

    “I would never counsel someone to surrender their hard-eaned sense of self from lessons learned in order to defer to people so unimaginative and disgusted by their personal ideas of ‘right’ and ‘wrong’ that they might literally subject themselves to be treated as if they were “scum” or without humanity. Rather than accept such projections as true, maybe we should be constantly gathering the strength to challenge it? There’s nothing wrong with dropping that burdensome victim status and disproving stupid stereotypes.”

    YES. YES, YES, YES!

    i luv u.

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