A few good articles: Fattorosi on Condoms & The Feminist Porn Awards

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Michael Fattorosi is an adult industry attorney and this was sent to me a few days ago via email. It’s very informative, but I’m finding no other reportage in the media on the current status of the condom mandate and meetings.

(NSFW–sort of :D ) – XBix.com, The Condoms Have Arrived (Sort Of):

As you may remember from my article last summer for XBIZ World, I declared that the condoms were coming. That declaration was in reference to the position that Cal/OSHA had taken at the June 7, 2011, meeting in Los Angeles where a strong contingency of representatives of the industry turned out to battle their attempts to (further) mandate barrier protection use in the production of adult entertainment. It should be noted that technically, barrier protections are and have been mandated by California Code of Regulations, Title 8, Section 5193 for quite some time. However, the enforcement of such regulation has been spotty at best.

Based on the rather slow enactment of additional barrier protection regulation by Cal/OSHA, Michael Weinstein and the AIDS Healthcare Foundation decided to take their safe sex battle to a different receptive governing body, the Los Angeles City Council and Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa.

What Does The Act Require

On Jan. 23, Villaraigosa signed into law, the City of Los Angeles Safer Sex in the Adult Film Industry Act, hereby now requiring any production of adult content, within the limits of the City of Los Angeles, to use condoms for anal and vaginal sex while filming content involving penetration and ensuring that all ejaculate remains outside of a performer’s body. The act also requires all producers to be compliant with CCR Title 8, Section 5193, noted above.

Where Does The Act Apply (or doesn’t)

If you are not aware of the city limits of Los Angeles it may be easier to understand what cities the Act does not apply to. Remember this is a City of Los Angeles law and not a County of Los Angeles law. The Board of Supervisors of the County of Los Angeles has not (yet) adopted this law and therefore there are still numerous unincorporated cities in Los Angeles County where the act does not apply. Also, the act is not law within the 88 other incorporated cities in the County of Los Angeles.

For example Agoura Hills, Alhambra, Arcadia, Artesia, Avalon, Azusa, Baldwin Park, Bell, Bell Gardens, Bellflower, Beverly Hills, Bradbury, Burbank, Calabasas, Carson, Cerritos, Claremont, Commerce, Compton, Covina, Cudahy, Culver City, Diamond Bar, Downey, Duarte, El Monte, El Segundo, Gardena, Glendale, Glendora, Hawaiian Gardens, Hawthorne, Hermosa Beach, Hidden Hills, Huntington Park, Industry, Inglewood, Irwindale, La Cañada Flintridge, La Habra Heights, La Mirada, La Puente, La Verne, Lakewood, Lancaster, Lawndale, Lomita, Long Beach, Lynwood, Malibu, Manhattan Beach, Maywood, Monrovia, Montebello, Monterey Park, Norwalk, Palmdale, Palos Verdes Estates, Paramount, Pasadena, Pico Rivera, Pomona, Rancho Palos Verdes, Redondo Beach, Rolling Hills, Rolling Hills Estates, Rosemead, San Dimas, San Fernando, San Gabriel, San Marino, Santa Clarita, Santa Fe Springs, Santa Monica, Sierra Madre, Signal Hill, South El Monte, South Gate, South Pasadena, Temple City, Torrance, Vernon, Walnut, West Covina, West Hollywood, Westlake Village and Whittier do not have a similar law mandating condoms as a condition to receive a film permit. However, two cities in Ventura County, Moorpark and Simi Valley, are contemplating passing similar municipal laws.

Also, the act does not apply to the 144 unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County. The act is not law in Ventura County or any other county in California, at the time this article was written.

The act is law only in the City of Los Angeles. However, it is the law and must be adhered to if a production is going to occur at a location that is within the City of Los Angeles. If a production is outside the limits of the City of Los Angeles, then the use of barrier protection is not a required condition to securing a permit.

Read more here

Thank you Anthony for sharing the link for the article below!

I will not lie, I find Gail Dines’ comment in the thread to be just as shrill and hysterical as Wendy Murphy’s reaction to a very composed Kayden Kross and the pro-Kayden audience on John Stossel’s show in February of this year. It’s a good article by Maura Kelly, I think. From the article:

“What makes these films “feminist” isn’t just that they feature performers who are more diverse in shape, size, sexual orientation, age, and race than in mainstream pornographic movies, but that the performers engage in sexual behaviors they enjoy. The directors and producers often “ask the actors what they like to do,” says Jansen. In mainstream porn, the performers don’t have any say in the matter.” — BRILLIANT!

Since Gail Dines likes to focus on pornographers who lure women in and talk them into doing what they want them to do against their better judgement, you’d think she might be even slightly kinder to women doing what they want to do. So, in Dines’ world, are all women purely academic and mental? Do female human beings shed their sexual skin altogether and stop being sensual creatures? I suppose we should be just like her? Hmm…

(SFW) – The Daily Beast, Can Porn Be Feminist?:

To kick off the annual Feminist Porn Awards on Wednesday night, adult filmmaker Buck Angel screened his documentary Sexing the Transman XXX to a cheering crowd at a University of Toronto lecture hall. In the movie, Angel talks to female-to-male transsexuals, like himself, about their sex-change experiences. Then he films them masturbating, with and without dildos.

Welcome to feminist pornography, a genre of sex films designed to appeal to people who feel put off by mainstream porn. In the world of feminist porn, women come in all shapes, sizes, and sexual orientations. The actresses don’t necessarily conform to the typical big-boobed, tiny-waisted ideal; some sport armpit hair. They look more like the average woman walking down the street or standing in line at Whole Foods than “porn stars.”

Angel’s documentary is one of 41 films from eight countries being celebrated at the annual awards event, which features several days of screenings and presentations, including an awards ceremony, held last night. Award categories include “Hottest Lesbian Feature Film,” “Sexiest Straight Movie,” and “Smutty Schoolteacher Award for Sex Education.”

Some feminist porn movies look like art-house movies—and meander, plotwise, like them too. Take Emile, for instance, one of this year’s contenders. Made by Canadian director N. Maxwell Lander, the movie features a zaftig woman in a silky robe getting herself off, and doing a lot of sexy cigarette smoking, too. There’s more of a narrative in Erika Lust’s Cabaret Desire, another nominated film, about a bohemian gathering spot where people go to hear erotic tales. Lust’s plot-heavy films typically appeal to straight women and couples.

In contrast, director Nenna Joiner’s oeuvre—including her latest work, Hella Brown—attracts and features gay women of color. Sex-ed students, meanwhile, might appreciate Gush: The Official Guide to the G-Spot and Female Ejaculation, also a nominee, a film produced by Good Vibrations, a San Francisco-based company that sells adult toys and educational materials.

The Feminist Porn Awards, now in their seventh year, are the brainchild of Carlyle Jansen, owner of Toronto adult toy store Good for Her. Filmmakers submit their movies for consideration; winners are chosen by a jury. This year’s jurists include Eden Baylee, a writer of literary erotica; Lorraine Hewitt, a burlesque performer known as CoCo La Creme; and Sheila Cavanagh, a gender and sexuality-studies professor at York University in Toronto, and the author of Queering Bathrooms: Gender, Sexuality and the Hygienic Imagination.

Jansen says the awards are a way to “acknowledge, celebrate, and endorse films and filmmakers that are redefining what porn can be.” For a film to qualify, a woman must have played a significant role in the making of the movie—in the production, writing, or directing. The film must also challenge stereotypes found in mainstream porn about what’s beautiful or sexy, and depict women or transsexuals experiencing genuine sexual pleasure.

Read more here


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Author: Julie Meadows

Francophile, oenophile, French Scrabble advocate and future zombie apocalypse survivor.

7 Comments

  1. First, on the condom mandate: it’s becoming quite apparent that the LA City Council may be on legally thin ice regarding this law, especially on the basis of their violating “sunshine law” meetings on the enforcement thereof. Perhaps that’s why AHF has now gone all in on expanding the mandate to include all of LA County…or hoping that they can get Cal-OSHA to expand their proposed regulations to include all of Cali…and even beyond.

    And, on the Feminist Porn article in the Daily Beast and Gail Dines’ slanderous rants: well, that’s simply par for the course for Gail, and it reveals the true nature of her sexual fascism and obsession with not only bashing male sexuality, but controlling women’s sexuality. The only difference between Gail and someone like, say, Aimee Sample McPherson, is that Gail mines Maoist/Marxist/radicalfeminist rhetoric rather than religion…but other than that, it’s exactly the same.

    Anyone who labels the 10 year life partner of Nina Hartley “a sadistic savage torturer of women” has automatically disqualified herself to be anyone’s critic.

    Anthony

  2. I feel this much is true:

    The moment you decide that you know everything there is to know and must inevitably give others instruction because they’re stupid, it’s time to go back to school.

    Dines is obviously very full of herself, angry and above the inquisitiveness that should be at the heart of her studies and practices. She makes some interesting points, as almost everyone does because no one is completely right or wrong about anything, but to hold herself up as the all-knowing feminist makes her a tyrant. Too bad.

  3. I honestly had not seen the problem with the mandatory condom law. However I was looking at it from my personal perspective; that the wearing of a condom does not determine whether or not I enjoy what I’m watching.

    At the same time I thought the law is rather silly and the choice should be left up to the performers.

    I watched the video of Kayden Kross and Wendy Murphy on Fox Business. When Kayden mentioned that wearing condoms for porn shoots can be uncomfortable I thought it made the argument against the mandatory condom law more understandable. I also liked when she pointed out that the industry could either go underground or somewhere where there’s no self-regulation which would cause a lot more harm than good.

    Unlike Dines I didn’t think the article was pro-porn. As a commenter had pointed out the writer covered both sides of the argument that porn can be feminist. I thought the article was very good.

    “Can porn be feminist”, Why couldn’t it?

  4. Another problem with the law is jurisdiction. Can married webcam couples be arrested now for not wearing a condom? Who inspects the sets and what is the fine for not wearing one?

    I feel that jumping to getting any law passed is hazardous. On the other hand, if it’s as simple as, ‘The gay industry largely embraces condoms,’ then that should be noted and expounded on. Instead, you find out that meetings are held and adult industry organizations and attorney’s aren’t notified. It’s a bizarre situation. Are they not being notified because of their tendency to show up in large numbers and yell and act hysterical? There are a number of things that are making it clear that this is more about something else rather than performer safety. Arresting married people, driving the industry underground or to other countries that may not even test and may employ women much younger than here is not necessarily a productive step. Pushing a law without plenty of forethought is just as hysterical a move as losing one’s temper and throwing a tantrum.

    I enjoyed Maura Kelly’s article, too. I so hope more articles come out like it.

  5. I definitely didn’t think about the married (webcam) couples. See I knew there was good reason for the opposition for the law, I just didn’t know what they were. :D

  6. I think performers should be able to choose. They’re taking the risk, it’s their bodies, it should be there choice. That is my humble opinion.

  7. I definitely appreciate this article.

    Mainstream porn is very stereotypical and gender specific. It tends to deter the average woman from consuming products and being receptive to the images and videos. What many do not know is that there is a thing called feminist porn which is much more open and shows women with more power and dominance. Yes it’s still sex but they play roles of power and confidence to make their own choices.
    Articles like yours and: http://getlusty.blogspot.com/2012/11/our-10-favorite-feminist-porn-stars.html are giving a voice to this type of “women friendly” porn. It gives the average woman a fresh perspective of female empowerment.

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