Articles on .XXX

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Every once in a while I like to highlight what other people are doing, and I’d like to do that with .XXX.

Dr. Chauntelle has her PhD in sociology, but unlike many people I’ve met (degree or no), she is intuitive and thoughtful. When she highlights anything questionable in the media, I pay attention.

Someone had told me they saw a .XXX commercial on a popular cable channel, but did not followup with me about it. They probably forgot.

If you are not familiar, Stuart Lawley–the Chairman of both ICM Registry and IFFOR–is part of the recent “mainstreaming” of porn; plugging sex into our psyches during boat races, road trips with grandma, and now during breaks from watching educational entertainment on the Discover Channel. Yay!!!

Not that sex-inspired thoughts don’t trickle through our brains at any given moment due to some kind of external stimulation, but if my understanding is correct, this is the first time that porn is being advertised on regular family programming here in The States, and at outdoor family events, (and on the side of a tour bus as we travel down the road).

In the past, .XXX was aggressively pushed as a way to protect children from adult sites, with its clearly identifiable url. I’m confused by the intention that it truly is designed (at least in part) to protect children, knowing a high profile family channel like the Discover Channel has taken up advertising a domain destination clearly created for showcasing adults having sex.

You’ll have to read Dr. Chauntelle’s post because there are some pretty gnarly stereotypes going on in two of the videos she highlights. It’s pretty bizarre stuff, to say the least.

Also, Amanda of Amanda36cA Camgirl’s Blog writes about reading ICM Registry’s Terms of Service and uncovering the unsettling language that indicates that if you sign up for any of ICM Registry’s domains, they reserve the right to reproduce any of your content in a compilation manner without having to compensate you. When Amanda tweeted @dotXXX to ask direct questions about her concerns, someone from @dotXXX registered to her site and responded. When she asked for verification that it was, in fact, someone at @dotXXX who had registered, a tweet from @dotXXX verified that, yes, they had registered to her site and responded.

Then someone else posing under a different name, but from the same IP address, registered to her site to talk about @dotXXX in a positive way, while also being selectively critical in places so as not to seem like a @dotXXX affiliate. Her writeup on the original post can be found here.

I’d also like to stress to anyone able to spare an hour or so, watch Stuart Lawley and Diane Duke debate .XXX at the September 2011 XBIZ EU Summit in London. There are some audio blips, an obnoxious, cackling pro .XXX female in the audience, and what sounds like a large door slamming in the background from time-to-time, but it’s otherwise clear and definitely enlightening.

I’m curious about some of the conversation.

At timecode 24:22 Lawley talks about giving Jerry Barnett the domain www.Anywhere.xxx, minus registration fees. He runs on at great length–great length–expounding on how many random names are available and how successful some have been already, after having bought up .XXX real estate. (All of this after Duke pointed out that Frank Schilling’s Name Administration was allowed to buy .XXX names in January, well before anyone in the adult world was allowed to reserve url’s during the .XXX Sunrise period from September 7, 2011 to October 30, 2011–not a very industry-friendly move, I’d say.)

Diane’s response is, “Stuart, I think you’re making a good point. So if that is where your money is going to be made, then why don’t you let the people who have the trademarked names just have their url’s for free?” And the crowd explodes with applause.

If anyone who can clarify some of the points being made and missed on either side would like to chime in and explain, I’d appreciate it. It’s hard to follow a few things, and Lawley runs on for so long at times I start to doze off. I think maybe when Lawley said he “gave” the url to Jerry Barnett, Duke misunderstood, because he also said “minus registration fees.” Maybe he meant he waived the application process for Jeff? The way he must have waived the application process and fees for Frank Schilling’s Name Registration? Because they’re friends? Why was he so confident to sell these urls before .XXX was approved by ICANN months later? Especially in light of how many times-spanning several years–ICANN had set him back by declining various steps in Lawley’s .XXX initiative?

As far as child protection goes, www.anywhere.xxx opens up straight to hardcore sex with no buffer page. How does money from .XXX go towards protecting children? If anyone knows the particulars, please share.


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Author: Julie Meadows

Francophile, oenophile, French Scrabble advocate and future zombie apocalypse survivor.

One Comment

  1. I haven’t seen any .XXX ads on cable yet. However, late at night there are ladies informercials, half-hour paid-programming for vibrators and “marital aids” of every shape and kind with giggling bubbly Pitch ladies.

    I don’t think to the twenty-somethings of today those three letters “XXX” carry the weight they did back in Grandpa’s & Grandma’s day of the ’80s first mass marketing of XXX on VHS tapes.

    I kid the nephews and nieces about it, but they all have XXX Anime they watch with girlfriends and boyfriends or just friends. And I’m sure there are some video games I haven’t been shown yet.

    This “dot XXX” is just a business scam that I don’t think will be paid much attention too anymore than people care if something is a .com or .org or .net when they “click” on a site.

    Analogy. The people most pushing for more security equipment against terrorist at airports and everywhere else are the people selling security equipment and giving campaign contributions to politicians to get them to approve more of this stuff.

    The people saying .XXX will protect children (who know where Dad hides his porn stash, you better believe it) are the people trying to sell .XXXs domain names.

    You can set “parental controls” to block .XXX sites or even programming on cable. But realistically, most parents don’t fool with setting up “parental controls” and passwords, they just warn, “Don’t let me catch you watching any of that stuff, or else,” and leave it at that.

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